“I am tired and sick of war. Its glory is all moonshine. It is only those who have neither fired a shot nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, for vengeance, for desolation. War is hell.”
— An opinion of war attributed to Union General William Tecumseh Sherman’s opinion of war during his retirement.  There are numerous quotes that follow the same theme and end with his famous phrase: ‘War is hell.’
Prototype Cutaway of the Day:  T52E3
The T52E3 was the last in a long line of prototypes built by the US between 1944 and 1957, it would finally be adopted by the US Army in 1957 as the M60 light machine gun.   It’s predecessors the T24 and the later T44 had been stepping stones leading to the T52.  It retains the MG42 and FG42s influences with the inline butt stock and top hinged receiver.
Interestingly the T52E3 also shares several features of the Johnson Light Machine Gun, with the front sight post, handguard and pistol grip being used, they may have been for ease as the parts were available.  The T52E3 was an air-cooled, fast barrel change light machine gun with a front bi-pod.  It was chambered in the new T-65 cartridge (the 7.62mm round also used in the M14).  It had a cyclic rate of approximately 700 rounds per minute and was fed from a belt with disintegrating links.   The T52E3 prototype came in two barrel types a light weight barrel (Image One) which was envisioned to be the standard for infantry patrols and a heavy barrel (Image Five) which weighed 7 lbs which was intended for sustained fire.  
The M60 would replace the cumbersome 31 lbs M1919A6, weighing significantly less at 23 lbs.  The T52E3 would be refined further until it was finally put into production in 1957, it would first see active service in Vietnam in 1964.

Image Source and Further Information
Prototype Cutaway of the Day:  T52E3
The T52E3 was the last in a long line of prototypes built by the US between 1944 and 1957, it would finally be adopted by the US Army in 1957 as the M60 light machine gun.   It’s predecessors the T24 and the later T44 had been stepping stones leading to the T52.  It retains the MG42 and FG42s influences with the inline butt stock and top hinged receiver.
Interestingly the T52E3 also shares several features of the Johnson Light Machine Gun, with the front sight post, handguard and pistol grip being used, they may have been for ease as the parts were available.  The T52E3 was an air-cooled, fast barrel change light machine gun with a front bi-pod.  It was chambered in the new T-65 cartridge (the 7.62mm round also used in the M14).  It had a cyclic rate of approximately 700 rounds per minute and was fed from a belt with disintegrating links.   The T52E3 prototype came in two barrel types a light weight barrel (Image One) which was envisioned to be the standard for infantry patrols and a heavy barrel (Image Five) which weighed 7 lbs which was intended for sustained fire.  
The M60 would replace the cumbersome 31 lbs M1919A6, weighing significantly less at 23 lbs.  The T52E3 would be refined further until it was finally put into production in 1957, it would first see active service in Vietnam in 1964.

Image Source and Further Information
Prototype Cutaway of the Day:  T52E3
The T52E3 was the last in a long line of prototypes built by the US between 1944 and 1957, it would finally be adopted by the US Army in 1957 as the M60 light machine gun.   It’s predecessors the T24 and the later T44 had been stepping stones leading to the T52.  It retains the MG42 and FG42s influences with the inline butt stock and top hinged receiver.
Interestingly the T52E3 also shares several features of the Johnson Light Machine Gun, with the front sight post, handguard and pistol grip being used, they may have been for ease as the parts were available.  The T52E3 was an air-cooled, fast barrel change light machine gun with a front bi-pod.  It was chambered in the new T-65 cartridge (the 7.62mm round also used in the M14).  It had a cyclic rate of approximately 700 rounds per minute and was fed from a belt with disintegrating links.   The T52E3 prototype came in two barrel types a light weight barrel (Image One) which was envisioned to be the standard for infantry patrols and a heavy barrel (Image Five) which weighed 7 lbs which was intended for sustained fire.  
The M60 would replace the cumbersome 31 lbs M1919A6, weighing significantly less at 23 lbs.  The T52E3 would be refined further until it was finally put into production in 1957, it would first see active service in Vietnam in 1964.

Image Source and Further Information
Prototype Cutaway of the Day:  T52E3
The T52E3 was the last in a long line of prototypes built by the US between 1944 and 1957, it would finally be adopted by the US Army in 1957 as the M60 light machine gun.   It’s predecessors the T24 and the later T44 had been stepping stones leading to the T52.  It retains the MG42 and FG42s influences with the inline butt stock and top hinged receiver.
Interestingly the T52E3 also shares several features of the Johnson Light Machine Gun, with the front sight post, handguard and pistol grip being used, they may have been for ease as the parts were available.  The T52E3 was an air-cooled, fast barrel change light machine gun with a front bi-pod.  It was chambered in the new T-65 cartridge (the 7.62mm round also used in the M14).  It had a cyclic rate of approximately 700 rounds per minute and was fed from a belt with disintegrating links.   The T52E3 prototype came in two barrel types a light weight barrel (Image One) which was envisioned to be the standard for infantry patrols and a heavy barrel (Image Five) which weighed 7 lbs which was intended for sustained fire.  
The M60 would replace the cumbersome 31 lbs M1919A6, weighing significantly less at 23 lbs.  The T52E3 would be refined further until it was finally put into production in 1957, it would first see active service in Vietnam in 1964.

Image Source and Further Information
Prototype Cutaway of the Day:  T52E3
The T52E3 was the last in a long line of prototypes built by the US between 1944 and 1957, it would finally be adopted by the US Army in 1957 as the M60 light machine gun.   It’s predecessors the T24 and the later T44 had been stepping stones leading to the T52.  It retains the MG42 and FG42s influences with the inline butt stock and top hinged receiver.
Interestingly the T52E3 also shares several features of the Johnson Light Machine Gun, with the front sight post, handguard and pistol grip being used, they may have been for ease as the parts were available.  The T52E3 was an air-cooled, fast barrel change light machine gun with a front bi-pod.  It was chambered in the new T-65 cartridge (the 7.62mm round also used in the M14).  It had a cyclic rate of approximately 700 rounds per minute and was fed from a belt with disintegrating links.   The T52E3 prototype came in two barrel types a light weight barrel (Image One) which was envisioned to be the standard for infantry patrols and a heavy barrel (Image Five) which weighed 7 lbs which was intended for sustained fire.  
The M60 would replace the cumbersome 31 lbs M1919A6, weighing significantly less at 23 lbs.  The T52E3 would be refined further until it was finally put into production in 1957, it would first see active service in Vietnam in 1964.

Image Source and Further Information

Prototype Cutaway of the Day:  T52E3

The T52E3 was the last in a long line of prototypes built by the US between 1944 and 1957, it would finally be adopted by the US Army in 1957 as the M60 light machine gun.   It’s predecessors the T24 and the later T44 had been stepping stones leading to the T52.  It retains the MG42 and FG42s influences with the inline butt stock and top hinged receiver.

Interestingly the T52E3 also shares several features of the Johnson Light Machine Gun, with the front sight post, handguard and pistol grip being used, they may have been for ease as the parts were available.  The T52E3 was an air-cooled, fast barrel change light machine gun with a front bi-pod.  It was chambered in the new T-65 cartridge (the 7.62mm round also used in the M14).  It had a cyclic rate of approximately 700 rounds per minute and was fed from a belt with disintegrating links.   The T52E3 prototype came in two barrel types a light weight barrel (Image One) which was envisioned to be the standard for infantry patrols and a heavy barrel (Image Five) which weighed 7 lbs which was intended for sustained fire.  

The M60 would replace the cumbersome 31 lbs M1919A6, weighing significantly less at 23 lbs.  The T52E3 would be refined further until it was finally put into production in 1957, it would first see active service in Vietnam in 1964.

Image Source and Further Information

Outbreak 1914: Weapons 1914-2014

In this video prepared by the National Army Museum as part of its ‘First World War in Focus' online learning resource a WWI reenactor compares his SMLE rifle with the British Army’s modern SA80 rifle.

Source

Historical Firearms now has a Twitter page, so if you tweet more than you tumbl you can follow here.  I also post a few other bits and pieces on there like photographs and videos.  Anyway check it out if you use Twitter!

Shaw Underhammer Pistol
Designed by Jacob Shaw, Jr. of Hinckley, Ohio this unusual pistol was patented in 1857.  Characterised by a large bulbous pistol grip and its unusually positioned cylinder Shaw’s pistol looks nothing like its contemporaries. 
The pistol fired a .30 calibre ball and had a six chamber cylinder, the weapon was loaded by removing the cylinder through a loading gate on the right side of the pistol and powder and ball were loaded and percussion caps were then place on the cylinders nipples which were angled at a 45 degree angle to enable the pistol’s hammer to strike them. 
Shaw first developed his pistol in 1853, presumably with the aim of building a pocket pistol which had no danger of its hammer snagging on clothing and preventing accidental discharges.  His solution was to place the pistol’s hammer is inside its stubby grip.  From the patent drawing we can see that this arrangement required some complex lock work. This intricate lock work was enabled by Shaw’s background as a clockmaker. Similarly the pistol is made safer by protecting the percussion caps themselves by what Shaw describes as a ‘recoil shield’ meaning that “no accidental discharge can occur by the percussion of extraneous bodies in fire-arms of this construction.”  This was also a feature not commonly found on contemporary pistols.
The pistol has a 3 1/4 inch octagonal barrel which aligned with the cylinder’s lowest chamber rather than the cylinder’s top chamber as common in other contemporary revolvers.  This makes conventional aiming problematic, Shaw addressed this with an ingenious if not wholly practical solution.  He combined the pistol’s centre cylinder pin with an extendable brass tube sight which could be retracted backwards towards the user. This extended the pistol’s sight radius with the user actually sighting along the tube through the pistol.  In the photograph above you can clearly see a small bead sight just above the muzzle, this was only visible once the tube sight extension had been extended.   While this unusual sight system was suitable for target shooting with the long sight radius stretching to approximately 7 inches.  This system would have been wholly impractical when shooting in self defense, for which the pocket pistol was presumably designed.


Right side of the Shaw Underhammer (source)

With no hammer visible it is natural to assume that the pistol used a double action mechanism to cock and fire the pistol with a single trigger pull.  However, it is actually actuated by a set of two triggers, the prominent first trigger indexes the cylinder and cocks the hammer while the second trigger, below the first, acts as a hair-trigger releasing the hammer.  So while the Shaw pistol appears to be a double action it is actually a two-stage action.
Some have rather interestingly described the Shaw as a ‘bullpup’ with the cylinder located above the grip.  Ergonomically speaking it is unlikely the Shaw was a particular pleasant pistol to shoot with a short, stubby grip. While the revolver’s main positive is its small size, being just 5-1/2 inch long, another is its low bore axis, a characteristic which may have made the pistol easier to shoot but this is something that would not come to be widely appreciated in pistol design for another 150 years. The example photographed is apparently the only surviving pistol although other sources suggest as many as fifty were originally produced.
Sources:

Image One Source
Image Two Source
Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms and Their Values, N. Flayderman (2007) 
Shaw Underhammer Pistol
Designed by Jacob Shaw, Jr. of Hinckley, Ohio this unusual pistol was patented in 1857.  Characterised by a large bulbous pistol grip and its unusually positioned cylinder Shaw’s pistol looks nothing like its contemporaries. 
The pistol fired a .30 calibre ball and had a six chamber cylinder, the weapon was loaded by removing the cylinder through a loading gate on the right side of the pistol and powder and ball were loaded and percussion caps were then place on the cylinders nipples which were angled at a 45 degree angle to enable the pistol’s hammer to strike them. 
Shaw first developed his pistol in 1853, presumably with the aim of building a pocket pistol which had no danger of its hammer snagging on clothing and preventing accidental discharges.  His solution was to place the pistol’s hammer is inside its stubby grip.  From the patent drawing we can see that this arrangement required some complex lock work. This intricate lock work was enabled by Shaw’s background as a clockmaker. Similarly the pistol is made safer by protecting the percussion caps themselves by what Shaw describes as a ‘recoil shield’ meaning that “no accidental discharge can occur by the percussion of extraneous bodies in fire-arms of this construction.”  This was also a feature not commonly found on contemporary pistols.
The pistol has a 3 1/4 inch octagonal barrel which aligned with the cylinder’s lowest chamber rather than the cylinder’s top chamber as common in other contemporary revolvers.  This makes conventional aiming problematic, Shaw addressed this with an ingenious if not wholly practical solution.  He combined the pistol’s centre cylinder pin with an extendable brass tube sight which could be retracted backwards towards the user. This extended the pistol’s sight radius with the user actually sighting along the tube through the pistol.  In the photograph above you can clearly see a small bead sight just above the muzzle, this was only visible once the tube sight extension had been extended.   While this unusual sight system was suitable for target shooting with the long sight radius stretching to approximately 7 inches.  This system would have been wholly impractical when shooting in self defense, for which the pocket pistol was presumably designed.


Right side of the Shaw Underhammer (source)

With no hammer visible it is natural to assume that the pistol used a double action mechanism to cock and fire the pistol with a single trigger pull.  However, it is actually actuated by a set of two triggers, the prominent first trigger indexes the cylinder and cocks the hammer while the second trigger, below the first, acts as a hair-trigger releasing the hammer.  So while the Shaw pistol appears to be a double action it is actually a two-stage action.
Some have rather interestingly described the Shaw as a ‘bullpup’ with the cylinder located above the grip.  Ergonomically speaking it is unlikely the Shaw was a particular pleasant pistol to shoot with a short, stubby grip. While the revolver’s main positive is its small size, being just 5-1/2 inch long, another is its low bore axis, a characteristic which may have made the pistol easier to shoot but this is something that would not come to be widely appreciated in pistol design for another 150 years. The example photographed is apparently the only surviving pistol although other sources suggest as many as fifty were originally produced.
Sources:

Image One Source
Image Two Source
Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms and Their Values, N. Flayderman (2007) 

Shaw Underhammer Pistol

Designed by Jacob Shaw, Jr. of Hinckley, Ohio this unusual pistol was patented in 1857.  Characterised by a large bulbous pistol grip and its unusually positioned cylinder Shaw’s pistol looks nothing like its contemporaries. 

The pistol fired a .30 calibre ball and had a six chamber cylinder, the weapon was loaded by removing the cylinder through a loading gate on the right side of the pistol and powder and ball were loaded and percussion caps were then place on the cylinders nipples which were angled at a 45 degree angle to enable the pistol’s hammer to strike them.

Shaw first developed his pistol in 1853, presumably with the aim of building a pocket pistol which had no danger of its hammer snagging on clothing and preventing accidental discharges.  His solution was to place the pistol’s hammer is inside its stubby grip.  From the patent drawing we can see that this arrangement required some complex lock work. This intricate lock work was enabled by Shaw’s background as a clockmaker. Similarly the pistol is made safer by protecting the percussion caps themselves by what Shaw describes as a ‘recoil shield’ meaning that “no accidental discharge can occur by the percussion of extraneous bodies in fire-arms of this construction.”  This was also a feature not commonly found on contemporary pistols.

The pistol has a 3 1/4 inch octagonal barrel which aligned with the cylinder’s lowest chamber rather than the cylinder’s top chamber as common in other contemporary revolvers.  This makes conventional aiming problematic, Shaw addressed this with an ingenious if not wholly practical solution.  He combined the pistol’s centre cylinder pin with an extendable brass tube sight which could be retracted backwards towards the user.
This extended the pistol’s sight radius with the user actually sighting along the tube through the pistol.  
In the photograph above you can clearly see a small bead sight just above the muzzle, this was only visible once the tube sight extension had been extended.  
While this unusual sight system was suitable for target shooting with the long sight radius stretching to approximately 7 inches.  This system would have been wholly impractical when shooting in self defense, for which the pocket pistol was presumably designed.

Right side of the Shaw Underhammer (source)

With no hammer visible it is natural to assume that the pistol used a double action mechanism to cock and fire the pistol with a single trigger pull.  However, it is actually actuated by a set of two triggers, the prominent first trigger indexes the cylinder and cocks the hammer while the second trigger, below the first, acts as a hair-trigger releasing the hammer.  So while the Shaw pistol appears to be a double action it is actually a two-stage action.

Some have rather interestingly described the Shaw as a ‘bullpup’ with the cylinder located above the grip.  Ergonomically speaking it is unlikely the Shaw was a particular pleasant pistol to shoot with a short, stubby grip. While the revolver’s main positive is its small size, being just 5-1/2 inch long, another is its low bore axis, a characteristic which may have made the pistol easier to shoot but this is something that would not come to be widely appreciated in pistol design for another 150 years. The example photographed is apparently the only surviving pistol although other sources suggest as many as fifty were originally produced.

Sources:

Image One Source

Image Two Source

Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms and Their Values, N. Flayderman (2007) 

Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here

Belgian Army in Action - 1914

The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.

The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.

The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 

When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.

German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.

At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.

Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 

The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.

Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 

6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here

Historical Firearms now has a Twitter page, so if you tweet more than you tumbl you can follow here.

Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here Belgian Army in Action - 1914
The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.
The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.
The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 
When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.


German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.
At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.


Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 
The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.
Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 
6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here

Belgian Army in Action - 1914

The collection of photographs above shows the Belgian Army in action during the first months of World War One.  It shows Belgian infantry and cavalry manning hastily prepared defenses, lining the banks of canals and firing on advancing German troops.

The role of the Belgian army during the First World War is often forgotten or charecterised by the slogan ‘Brave Little Belgium’ holding off the invading Germans until they were quickly overwhelmed.  The Belgian Army were instrumental in slowing the initial German advance and they performed far better than their allies and the Germans had expected this line of thought still minimises their role. The photographs collected above show the Belgian Army in action during the first months of the war during fighting around Liege, Namur and during the retreat to and defence of Antwerp until late October when they were pushed back and held only a small corner of southwest Belgium.

The Belgian strategy in the event of war was to gather its field army in the centre of the country behind the Gete River while the National Redoubt, a 95 mile long belt of defensive fortifications ringing Antwerp, would hold the Belgian left flank while forts at Liege and Namur would buy the main field army time to mobilise.  One of the most concerning issues was that the Belgian Army had never in its history fought a single major engagement, the country’s neutrality until now unbroken, had precluded this.  No Belgian general officer had ever commanded troops in the field and none of the troops, even the most seasoned veterans have ever fired a shot in anger or been fired upon. 

When war came the Belgian army followed their plans and the forts at Liege and Namur were soon engaged by the enemy.  The main Belgian field army concentrated behind the Gete River.  However, in the face of modern German heavy artillery Liege fell in just ten days, Namur in just four and Brussels had to be abandoned.  The majority of the Belgian Army retreated towards Antwerp fighting delaying actions along the way. By late August the French and British had advanced north into Belgium but had underestimated the weight of the German attack and were forced to retreat leaving the Belgians to face the Germans at Antwerp.

German map showing the German attack on Antwerp and the Belgian withdrawal on the 10th Oct. (source)

A strong German holding force under the command of Hans von Beseler  ringed the city in late August.  The Siege of Antwerp began on the 28th September with the main Belgian force now holding the city’s defensive lines.   On the 28th September, the Germans brought up the heavy artillery that had reduced Liege, Namur and Maubeuge.  The outer forts quickly came under heavy fire steadily making the Belgian position untenable.  The Belgian army launched a number of division-sized counterattacks, sortieing from the city on three separate occasions.  The first on the 24th of August was made in support of British and French forces fighting in southern Belgium, the second sortie saw three infantry divisions supported by cavalry strike southeast reaching as far as Leuven. This was an attempt to draw further German troops north away from the main allied line.  The final sortie was made on the 26th September attacked German troops east of Antwerp.

At the Belgian command’s request elements of the British Naval Division arrived in early October with Naval infantry and a brigade of Royal Marines arriving to bolster the city’s defence.  Winston Churchill the First Lord of the Admiralty arrived to survey the situation and quickly volunteered to take command of the city’s defence.  However, his suggestion was rejected.  Further reinforcements were planned with two British divisions landing further west at Ostend but were unable to reach Antwerp before the Belgian Army was forced to abandon the city.

Sailors of the British Naval Division on the march near Antwerp (source)

By the beginning of October, the heavy German artillery was systematically destroying Antwerp’s outer forts and German infantry was probing the Belgian line.  On the 2nd October the German’s began attacking in force and the Belgian command began preparations to withdraw west to Ostend if the National Redoubt became untenable.  The British Naval Division joined some 80,000 Belgian garrison troops manning the 25 principal forts.  The outer forts were indefensible and abandoned by the 4th and the decision to withdraw the main Belgian Army west was made on the 7th October.  By the 9th the Belgian Army had withdrawn leaving the garrison troops and the British Naval Division holding the line.  The last troops began to withdraw with the British forced to retreat north hoping to loop west however, their line of retreat was cut by German artillery fire and they were forced to cross into neutral Holland where they were interned by the Dutch.  About a third of the Belgian garrison met a similar fate while approximately 30,000 Belgian troops were captured the remainder retreated west joining the rest of the Belgian army near Ostend.  On the morning of the 10th October Antwerp surrendered. 

The remaining Belgian forces took up a position west running between Nieuport and Dixmude.  With the Belgian Army exhausted King Albert ordered the sluice gates at Nieuport opened and the coastal plain flooded to impede the German offensive.  For the next four years the Belgian Army held onto this corner of western Belgium while the German Army occupied the rest of the their country. In 1918, during the Hundred Days offensive the Belgian Army took to the offensive with the rest of the allied forces pushing the Germans back.

Image Sources:

1  2  3  4  5 

6  7  8  9  10

More on the Belgian Army during World War One here

Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know!

Recent Recap

Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   

This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.

Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.

__________________________________________________________

Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910

Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle

Japanese Infantry Weapons

Blake Rifle

Tokarev’s SVT-40

The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week:

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)

Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch

French Pistol Panic (WWI)

Advertisements for Officers

British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart

The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England

The Retreat From Mons

The First Battle of the Marne

The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare

Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany

75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany

Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War

Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne

Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne

General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne

A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne

General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne

Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches

Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________

As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know!

Q

Anonymous asked:

Has the intended purpose of the maxim machine gun changed since it was originally invented?

A

We’ll the Maxim Gun was just one of the first of a whole class of firearms. Machine guns have evolved massively over the last 100 years from them belt fed water-cooled tripod mounted Maxim to the magazine fed assault rifle and sub machine gun. When the machine gun first appeared on the battle field armies were unsure how to use them tactically.

By World War One they had fallen into a suppressive fire role but as the technology advanced and the weapons became smaller and more mobile they’ve continued to dominate the modern battlefield. Eventually I’ll get around to writing more on the development of machine gun tactics because it’s an interesting topic.

Q

Anonymous asked:

what was the purpose of the maxim machine gun?

A

I suppose the most basic answer is that when it was invented it was intended to be a force multiplier.  It in effect killed more of your enemy, faster.  In 1900 a trained rifleman with the latest magazine-fed rifle could (optimistically) fire on average 20 rounds in a minute.  A Maxim gun can fire 500 rounds a minute so in effect one Maxim gun equals a platoon of riflemen - a platoon of riflemen whose rate of fire won’t slow as they get tired. 

You can find everything I’ve written about the Maxim Gun here.

Thanks for the question.

Thanks for all the great suggestions guys I’ve added them all to my list of things to cover in the next few weeks so hopefully I’ll get round to most of them.  

You can still suggest any firearms you’d like to see covered here.

scrapironflotilla answered your post: Any Requests?

Martini Enfields and other British service rifles.

I’ve covered the Enfield rifle extensively already you can find posts on them here.  But I’m long overdue on covering the Martini-Henry so I’ll add it to my list!

Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
__________________________________________________________
Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

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As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know! Recent Recap
Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   
This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.
Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.
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Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910
Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle
Japanese Infantry Weapons
Blake Rifle
Tokarev’s SVT-40
The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week: 

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)
Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch
French Pistol Panic (WWI)
Advertisements for Officers
British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart
The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The Retreat From Mons
The First Battle of the Marne
The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare
Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany
75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany
Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War
Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne
General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne
A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne
General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne
Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches
Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________
As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know!

Recent Recap

Since the last recap the series of posts looking at the early battles of the First World War has continued and some more general posts have returned.  Some interesting firearms have been covered recently including the Blake Rife and the SVT-40 as well as an overview of the guns designed by Aimo Lahti. There has also been the return of the 'Gun That Killed…' series with an in-depth look at the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.  There have been posts looking at everything from conservation of medieval suits of armour to a look at almost every Japanese infantry weapon used during World War Two.   

This month also saw the setting up of a Historical Firearms Twitter page where content gets posted so if you’re not a regular tumblr user or you prefer Twitter you can take a look at the Twitter page here.

Had lots of new followers recently and some great questions have been asked so thanks again for following/reading, if you have any questions feel free to send me a message here.   Also don’t forget to sign up for the Historical Firearms inbox service to receive daily or regular updates on content, find out more here and follow on Twitter here.

__________________________________________________________

Firearms:

The Gun That Killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand: FN M1910

Evolution of the M1903 Springfield Rifle

Japanese Infantry Weapons

Blake Rifle

Tokarev’s SVT-40

The Guns of Aimo Lahti

Ordnance of the Week:

Hotchkiss & Maxim 37mm Auto-Cannons

Sword & Armour:

Cleaning 16th Century Armour

Historical Trivia:

Septemberprogramm (Germany’s aims during WWI)

Trench Raiding Rifle-Torch

French Pistol Panic (WWI)

Advertisements for Officers

British Expeditionary Forces, 25 Years Apart

The Venezuelan Tortuga Tank

Miscellaneous History:

The Union Between Scotland & England

The Retreat From Mons

The First Battle of the Marne

The Transition from a War of Movement to Trench Warfare

Front Pages: 75th Anniversary of Britain Declaring War on Germany

75th Anniversary of Neville Chamberlain’s Speech Announcing War With Germany

Fort Nepean: First Australian Shots of the War

Historians and Languages

Daily Definitions:

Glacis

Quotes of the Day:

General Franchet d’Esperey the French 5th Army, on the eve of the Battle of the Marne

Marshal Joffre’s ominous message to the French army on the eve of the Battle of the Marne

General Ferdinand Foch’s, commander of the French Ninth Army, message to Marshal Joseph Joffre during the Battle of the Marne

A pessimistic  letter from General Alexander Von Kluck, commander of the German 1st Army, to his wife after the Battle of the Marne

General Joffre to Field Marshal French on the eve of the Battle of the Aisne

Sir John French in a letter to King George V describing the importance of trenches

Sir John French in a private letter to the Prince Arthur on the importance of trenches

____________________________________________

As always If you have any requests for firearms you like to see on the page then please feel free to let me know!

enrique262 answered your post: Any Requests?

Japanese small arms, horrible, unreliable japanese firearms!

An overview of Japanese Infantry Weapons of World War Two, as requested!